Grammar Rules

Grammar rules AdjectivesA Little/A Lot

A Little or A Lot

Rule

Use a lot for uncountable nouns (e.g., jam, time) to indicate many, or a large number. Use a little for uncountable nouns to indicate a small number. Notice that a lot is followed by the word of (unike a little). For example:

  1. I don’t have a lot of money.
  2. I owe him a little money.

Examples for a little and a lot

  1. She eats a lot of marmalade each morning.
  2. I’d like a little oatmeal instead of toast.
  3. He spent a lot of money on hair implants.
  4. Dust the pan with a little flour so the cake doesn’t stick.
  5. Kids require a lot of attention.
  6. I only have a little laundry to do.
  7. There’s a lot of spare change in that 5-gallon bucket.
  8. I need to spend a little time studying before we go out.
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A little / a lot exercises

Decide whether you have to use a little or a lot:

  1. That may cost you _______ of money.
  2. I added _______ sugar to the mix.
  3. You’ll have to spend _______ of cash on this car.
  4. I can do it with _______ help from my friends.
  5. _______ change can really make a difference.
  6. I don’t have _______ of free time today.
  7. He left _______ of laundry for me to do.
  8. She gave him _______ attention.

Answers:

  1. a lot
  2. a little
  3. a lot
  4. a little
  5. a little
  6. a lot
  7. a lot
  8. a little