Phrase of the Day | Ginger Software

Phrase of the Day

Ginger’s Phrase of the Day provides you with a daily dose of interesting facts and trivia on some of the more, and less, common phrases in the English language. Learn the real meaning behind these phrases, when and how to use them and other less-known info behind each phrase.

Champagne Taste on a Beer Budget Phrase

Champagne Taste on a Beer Budget

The phrase ‘champagne taste on a beer budget’ refers to someone who lives above her means and likes expensive things she can’t possibly afford.

Example of use:  Laura – “I can’t believe Kimberly spent her entire salary on her red Jimmy Choo’s.” Dana– “That doesn’t surprise me at all, she has a champagne taste on a beer budget.”

No Spring Chicken Phrase

No Spring Chicken

The phrase ‘No Spring Chicken’ is usually used in a negative way to describe someone who is no longer young, probably past his young adulthood, and sometimes doesn’t realize it and tries to look and act younger than his age.

Example of use: “I don’t know how old Mike is, but obviously he is no spring chicken.”

Putting Lipstick on a Pig Phrase

Putting Lipstick on a Pig

‘Putting Lipstick on a Pig’ is a rhetorical term generally used in reference to someone who’s trying to make cosmetic or superficial changes on himself that clearly doesn’t deceive anyone.

Example of useMarla – “Did you see Susan’s new hairdo? I guess she thought that cutting her bangs and coloring her hair bright orange looks good.” Joe – “Oh please, it’s like putting lipstick on a pig.

Comfort Food Phrase

Comfort Food

‘Comfort Food’ is  food that gives emotional comfort and provides a nostalgic or sentimental feeling to the person eating it. It’s usually prepared in a traditional way and reminds the person of her childhood, home, family and friends.

Example of use: Jessie –”Every time I get upset, I ask my husband to make me a big bowl of Grandma’s delicious creamy Mac & cheese and imagine myself  sitting in her kitchen, with not a worry in the world.” Emma –”Wow, that sounds like the perfect comfort food. The only thing my Grandmother could make was Apfelstrudel, and I hate apples.” 

Brass Monkey Weather Phrase

Brass Monkey Weather

The phrase ‘Brass Monkey Weather’ refers to very cold weather that is extremely out of the ordinary; cold enough to freeze the tail, nose and ears of a brass monkey.

Example of use: “According to Al Roker next week’s weather is going to be so cold, that it’ll be real brass monkey weather.”  

Wet Behind the Ears Phrase

Wet Behind the Ears

The meaning of the phrase “Wet Behind the Ears” is someone who is very young, naive and inexperienced.

Example of use: “I can’t believe they decided to promote Kelly. If you ask me, I think she’s still wet behind the ears”. 

Salad Days Phrase

Salad Days

The phrase “Salad Days” refers to a time when a person is at the peak of his abilities.

Example of use: Mark -“When I was young I went out every night, came back home at 4 in the morning, slept for 3 hours and went to work feeling awesome”.  Ron-“well those were your salad days. You’re too old for that today”

Play Hooky Phrase

Play Hooky

The phrase ‘Play Hooky’ means to skip school, work or any other obligation without a justified excuse.

Example of use: “My friends are playing hooky today so that they can be first in line to buy tickets for the concert tonight”

Greatest Thing Since Sliced Bread Phrase

Greatest Thing Since Sliced Bread

The idiom ‘Greatest thing since sliced bread’ means that something is the best and most useful innovation or development invented for a long time.

Example of use: “I’ve bought a new touchscreen computer, it’s the greatest thing since sliced bread, I can’t believe I ever worked without it”. 

Finger-lickin' Good Phrase

Finger-lickin’ Good

“Finger-lickin’ good” generally refers to especially tasty food.

Example of use: Ruth—”Mom’s pasta was so delicious that I had three bowls of it , Roger—”I know, it was finger-lickin’ good”.