Phrase of the Day | Ginger Software

Phrase of the Day

Ginger’s Phrase of the Day provides you with a daily dose of interesting facts and trivia on some of the more, and less, common phrases in the English language. Learn the real meaning behind these phrases, when and how to use them and other less-known info behind each phrase.

a leopard can't change his spots

A Leopard Can’t Change His Spots

The phrase “a leopard can’t change his spots” means, that it’s impossible for one to change their character, even if they will try very hard.

Examples in use: “The teacher tried to be kind to her students, but a leopard can’t change its spots, she was still very mean.”

hit the sheets

Hit The Sheets

The phrase “hit the sheets’  means going to bed or falling asleep.

Examples in use: “ Exhausted from her day at in the office, Hannah hit the sheets.”

a lemon

A Lemon

The phrase ‘A lemon’ typically describes a second hand vehicle that, once purchased, ends up having plenty of flaws.

Example in use: “My brothers’ car is a lemon. He spends half of his weekend fixing his car.”

A fool and his money are easily parted'

A Fool And His Money Are Easily Parted

The phrase ‘a fool and his money are easily parted’ means to say that stupid individuals don’t know how to save their cash.

Example in use: “Mike likes living in style – but then a fool and his money are easily parted.” 

misc___don_t_give_up_your_day_job_by_caat-d5iu90r

Don’t Give Up The Day Job

The phrase “don’t give up the day job ” means that you ought to keep doing what you are great at, instead of taking a stab at something new or turning your hobby into your profession.

Example of use: “I tasted the cupcake you baked yesterday. My feedback is: don’t give up your day job!”

Oops vector smiley  isolated on white background

Wouldn’t Be Caught Dead

The phrase ‘wouldn’t be caught dead’ is used to say that you really don’t like something or wouldn’t want to be seen in that situation.

Examples in use: “He is very conscious of his public image and wouldn’t be caught dead doing anything that might batter his image.”

boy-n-gal-turnaround-back

To See The Back Of

The phraseto see the back of” means that you’ll be glad when somebody leaves because you do not get along or do not like that persona.

Example in use: “My sister-in-law became an absolute pain, I was really pleased to see the back of her.”

off_your_rocker

Off One’s Rocker

The phrase ‘off one’s rocker’ is used to say that someone is insane or not thinking properly.

Example in use: “If you think that you are going to win the jackpot this week, you are off your rocker.”

 

Bridge

Cross That Bridge When You Come To It

The phrase “cross that bridge when you come to it” is used to say that you don’t need to ponder over a situation until it really happens.

Example of use: “My sister worries too much about what might happen when her kids grow up and move out, so people are always saying “you’ll cross that bridge when you come to it” to her.

Autism Bulb with a Stop Sign

Keep Something At Bay

The phrase ‘keep something at bay’ means; that you try to stop a problematic situation from getting closer to you.

Example in use: “That kid is very problematic; I am doing my best to keep him at bay.”