Mar 13th 2017

<< Back

Speak vs Talk

When Each Should Be Used

Speak_vs_Talk (002)

 It’s often wondered when each should be used, with regard to the words “speak” and “talk”. Speaking and talking produce the same outcomes. However, their uses are not interchangeable.

A single person speaks, the action does not require any additional participants. Whereas two or more people talk; when this occurs, it is implied that a conversation is taking place.

The difference between the two words directly relates to their transitivity. Or, in other words, the grammatical object that directly follows the verbs speak and talk. If a verb needs an object (not all verbs do) then it is considered to be transitive.

Talk and its tenses are only used transitively, while speak and its tenses can stand alone or be combined with an object.

Let’s look at this table for clarification:

chart3 speak vs talk

In addition, the difference between the two words extends to their usages, regardless of a number of participants. Talk is used to describe non-formal communications. Speak is used to refer to more serious or formal interactions.

Examples of usage:

Talk

      • I need to talk to you.
      • Please, stop talking!
      • Did you talk to Jenny?
      • I’m not going away until you talk to me.

Speak

      • Feel free to speak your mind.
      • They don’t speak to each other anymore.
      • Does your boss speak from experience?
      • She started to speak, but then Dan cut her short.

Bottom line:

When describing an informal conversation, the word “talk” is used. As seen in the examples above, the use implies a multi-person interaction and has a tone of familiarity.

When referring to lectures or a person’s capability, “speak” is used. Also, as stated in the examples above, speak implies the actions of a singular individual and the word brings on a tone of seriousness.

Talk to us!
Malki Ehrlich. Ginger Software

<< Back

One Response to “Speak vs Talk”

  1. Violeta Ortega on March 29th, 2017

    Very useful, great information.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

  • (will not be published)