Mar 17th 2013

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

Today is St. Patrick’s Day. St. Patrick was a Christian saint from Ireland who is said to have died on March 17th.

One of the best ways to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day is by writing a creative toast, or sláinte (pronounced slahn-chə) in Gaelic, the language of Ireland.

When you are typing your own toast, make sure that you use Ginger to help proofread, unless you are writing it in Gaelic!

Here is one of our favorite Irish toasts:

Wishing you a rainbow
For sunlight after showers—
Miles and miles of Irish smiles
For golden happy hours—
Shamrocks at your doorway
For luck and laughter too,
And a host of friends that never ends
Each day your whole life through!

Post your favorite Irish toast, or write your own in the comments section below!

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

The Ginger Team

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Mar 14th 2013

Happy Pi Day!

Source: http://www.geek.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/Pi_pie2.jpg

Today, March 14, is Pi Day!

Pi Day celebrates the mathematical constant Pi and is often celebrated by eating pies.

“Pi” and “pie” are homophones, or words that have the same sound as each other but are spelled differently and have different meanings.

If you wanted to measure the distance around the crust of your favorite apple pie, Pi is the tool that you would use. Pi expresses the ratio of the circumference to the diameter of a circle. It took mathematicians thousands of years to develop the Pi ratio.

Pi Day is celebrated today because the concept of Pi begins with 3.14, just like the date March 14 (3/14).

Physicist Larry Shaw officially celebrated the first Pi Day in 1988 at the San Francisco Exploratorium where he worked as a scientist.

While the celebration of Pi Day is a modern concept, the notion of Pi has existed for thousands of years. Many people believe that the ancient Egyptians used Pi to plan the area and height of the pyramids. In fact, they could have been eating pie (an ancient Egyptian snack) while they were designing these giant structures.

Homophones are not a mathematical concept. However, just like incorrectly calculating a math problem can result in a wrong answer, confusing words can result in significant contextual errors. You wouldn’t want to be misunderstood asking for a cup of coffee and a piece of Pi, would you? 3.14 might not be as tasty as pecan, apple or cherry.

What flavor of pie will you be eating this year on Pi Day?

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Mar 13th 2013

Wednesday Word: Immigration or Emigration?

Photo Source: Nova Pictures/Flickr

Photo Source: Nova Pictures/Flickr

Have you ever immigrated to a country? If so, where did you emigrate from? Confused? “Immigration” and “emigration” are two words that are easily mixed up.

Immigration is the act of moving to a new country. Therefore, an immigrant is someone who has arrived in a new country. When you arrive at a large airport in the United States or Canada, you will often see signs for “Immigration.” These are the administrative offices for people (immigrants) who are arriving to live in the country and not just staying for a visit.

Emigration is the act of permanently leaving your country to settle in another country. You emigrate from the country you live in. For example, you may emigrate from (leave) Poland and move to live in Canada. Therefore, you are a new immigrant to Canada but an emigrant from Poland.

A quick way to remember the difference between these two very similar words is to think of them using their first letters. “Immigration” is the act of moving into a country. (The “i” stands for into.) Similarly, “emigration” concerns the act of moving away, or exiting, your county. (The “e” stands for exit.) By remembering the “e” and “i”, you won’t have a problem keeping these two words straight.

Has your family recently immigrated to or emigrated from somewhere?

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Mar 11th 2013

Monday Mistake: Fried Beef with Wikipedia!

Ever thought of quenching your thirst for knowledge at a Chinese restaurant? Did the owners come up with an innovative food establishment where knowledge seekers can access Wikipedia for free while they eat?

Most likely, the writer used Google Translate while creating the menu.

Mistranslations can cause giant and expensive problems. While this humorous typo probably won’t cause heartburn, in 2009 the bank HSBC had to spend $10 million on a rebranding campaign after their slogan “assume nothing” was mistranslated into “do nothing” in various countries around the world.

The moral of this story is to make sure you have a trusty proofreader. Ginger can do the trick for all your editing needs – whether menus or food descriptions.

Add Ginger to your fried beef and avoid the taste of web pages in your mouth!

To see another funny example of Engrish, check out this blog post.

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Mar 7th 2013

Ginger celebrates International Woman’s Day!

In 1908, thousands of women in New York protested against their long hours, low pay and lack of voting rights. As a result, the first Woman’s Day was celebrated in the U.S.

The pioneering women that worked hard to gain the right to vote were known as “Suffragettes.”

The word “Suffragette” is derived from the word “suffrage,” meaning the right to vote, especially in a political election; and the suffix “-ette,” meaning “female.”

With the rise of socialism and the expansion of the Industrial Revolution, the suffragette’s struggle for women’s rights gained momentum internationally.

 

In Copenhagen during 1910, Clara Zetkin, a leader in the “Women’s Office” for the Social Democratic Party in Germany, proposed the idea of having a worldwide Women’s Day to highlight discrimination against women. She presented this idea at a conference of over 100 women from 17 countries. Her idea was adopted; thus creating International Women’s Day.

Today, International Women’s Day is celebrated as an official holiday by many countries. In some countries – such as China, Nepal and Madagascar – it is a holiday for women only. March 8 has become a global day for celebrating the economic, political and social achievements of women of the past, present and future.

Read more: http://www.internationalwomensday.com/

Take the time to support the advancement of women during this International Women’s Day!

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