Yearly Archives: 2013

Jun 17th 2013

Ginger’s Android App Update!

Get the most out of your Ginger keyboard with Ginger’s new correct-as-you-type feature!

Ginger Spelling and Grammar Keyboard is a free, simple-to-use Android app that corrects typos, errors and misused words. Its revolutionary user interface maximizes your mobile productivity anywhere and anytime.

With this new feature, users can correct full texts as they type or with a single click when they finish writing. Additional updates include:

* Performance improvements and bug fixes
* New and improved user interface
* Improved quality of corrections

“The app saves time by giving you the ability to quickly proofread text…. [Ginger] should be a mainstay on your device….” – AppStorm

Use it to correct your text messages, Whatsapp messages, Gmail and Outlook emails, and even social media apps such as Facebook, Twitter and more – it’s the only grammar and spelling app that understands your terminology, names and even slang!

What are you waiting for? Start communicating better NOW!

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.gingersoftware.android.keyboard

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Jun 16th 2013

Origins of the Word “Father”

Happy Father’s Day!
The first Father’s Day first was celebrated in 1910 in Spokane, Washington. Today, Father’s Day is celebrated all over the world, usually on the 3rd Sunday of June. We know about the origin of Father’s Day (it was created as a response to Mother’s Day just over 100 years ago) but what about the origin of the word “Father?”

The English word father can be traced to a the following languages:

From Middle English: fader
From Old English: fæder
From Proto-Germanic: fadēr

The word “father” also has connections to the following ancient languages:
Latin: pater, Ancient Greek: πατήρ (patēr), and Sanskrit: पितृ (pitṛ).

What about the word “dad?”

The first known record of the word “dad” was around the year 1500. Scholars suggest that the origin of the word “dad” actually comes from the first noises that kids make. “Dad” or “dada” also sounds similar in many different languages and consists of two similar sounding consonants.

In Welsh: tad
Irish daid:
Czech, Latin and Greek: tata
Lithuanian: tete
Sanskrit: tatah

No matter how you say it, Ginger wishes you and your dad a wonderful day!

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Jun 12th 2013

How to Write a Great Resume

How to write a great resume
The difference between a good resume and great resume can often be boiled down to two things: formatting and relevancy. Make your resume short and sweet. Choose quality over quantity when it comes to your skills, experiences and references and tailor each version of your resume to the specific company and industry that you are applying for.

Your resume should tell your potential employer who you are (contact info) and what you can do (skills) while providing examples of your qualifications, references and work experience. Triple check your contact information, did you spell your name correctly?

Does it fit your field?
Different industries often have different formats for resumes. Use Google to find resume templates formatted for your specific field. If you are applying to an energy company as an engineer you would not use the same resume format as a piano teacher!

Elaborate on the right skills and strengths
Outline all of your relevant strengths but make sure you are not wasting your space and the reader’s time by listing irrelevant skills and strengths. It may have been cool to have been a fraternity party DJ five years ago, but it will not increase your employability at the bank.

Limit to one page
Many employers admit to favoring resumes that are limited to one sheet. A one page resume shows that you can prioritize and know how to summarize your achievements in an easy to read format. When writing your resume be inspired by Twitter: keep it short and sweet. Today we are used to digesting short and relevant snippets of information and your resume should reflect this.

Proofread, Proofread, Proofread!
Nothing spells “unprofessionalism” like a spelling mistake on your resume! Once you finish writing your resume carefully proofread it section by section. To be 100% sure that is free of spelling and grammar mistakes, download Ginger’s free proofreader!

Use these tips to make your resume the best that it can be. What tips can you add?

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Jun 4th 2013

How to Write a Great Blog

Blogs (a contraction of the words “web” and “log”) have grown rapidly since the late 1990’s. Everyday blogs become easier and easier to create, edit and enhance. Blogs are so popular nowadays that 2 new blogs are created every second! With nearly 200,000 new blogs being created each day, what can you do to make your blog stand out?

Pick a topic that you are either knowledgeable or passionate about
Share your excitement! If you have been building model airplanes for the last 20 years, share your knowledge! Start with the who, what, where and why of your subject.

Even if you are not the leading expert on the subject that you want to write about, if you have passion you can use that to fuel some great writing. For example, let’s say that you are applying for a Master’s Degree in Psychology. Document your journey. Share your search strategies, successes and frustrations that you experience along the way.

Use your blog to make the application process easier for others who want to follow in your path.

Write short paragraphs
The shorter your paragraph, the more likely you are to keep your reader reading. The longer the paragraph, the higher the chances are that the reader will lose their place and stop reading.

Keep the reader on your blog!
At the end of your blog post, write a few sentences highlighting and linking to another post on your blog that would be relevant to the reader.

Use pictures
Post at least one image with each blog post. Use free programs like Instagram or Pixlr-o-matic to edit and enhance your pictures.

Connect with similar bloggers
Find other bloggers that write about similar topics and connect with them. Add their blogs to a “blog reel” (blogs that you support) and ask them to do the same.

What blogging tips can you add?

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May 28th 2013

The Huffington Post highlights 3 ways that Ginger can improve your writing

A recent article in the Huffington Post highlights 3 of the ways that Ginger can improve your writing.

1. Ginger understands context!
To help perfect Ginger’s contextual spelling and grammar checker, Ginger has analyzed over 1 trillion sentences online. This giant base of knowledge makes Ginger’s suggestions for your writing always on target.

2. Ginger is personal!
Our newest feature, Ginger Coach, is now available with our premium product to help non-native English learners improve their language skills without the need for an expensive tutor or pricey textbooks.

3. Ginger is in your pocket!
We have taken our expertise and experience with the English language and have literally put it in your pocket. You can now download our Ginger keyboard for your Android device in the Google Play Store. Use Ginger’s Keyboard to make sure all of your writing is error-free even when you are on the run!

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May 27th 2013

Ginger’s Word of the Week “Send and Run”

Are you guilty of using the “send and run” to deliver bad news? This genius phrase was UrbanDictionary.com’s word of the day on May 6.

Here is the “official” definition:

The act of delivering bad or unpleasant news via email at the very last point in the day, so as to purposely avoid being there when the response is received. Usually deployed just after 5pm or before going away on holiday.

Person 1 – “I really don’t want to have to deal with this”

Person 2 -“Why don’t you just do a send and run?”

If you are using the “send and run” option to deliver bad news ensure that you are not making the bad news even worse with bad grammar or spelling mistakes. To be sure your “send and runs” are error free use Ginger’s proofreader to check all your emails.

Have you ever used the “send and run?”

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May 22nd 2013

4 Tips for Writing a College Admissions Essay

Are you about to start writing your college admissions essay? Don’t stress! We have 4 tips that will make the essay writing process simpler and smoother. Enjoy!

1.  Stay focused
Once you have started writing, stay on topic. Choose an experience in which you learned a life-changing lesson or have a story to tell and work hard to stay on this particular subject. Don’t be tempted to stray off topic or throw in other achievements along the way.

2. Describe the “why,” not the “what”
Start your application essay by explaining “why” you did something that you are proud of rather than just describing “what” you did or “how” you did it. Describing what prompted you to start your own business (the “why”) is more interesting than the details of how you did it (the “what”).

3. What makes YOU unique?
Describe the talents, hobbies and skills that YOU bring with you to college. Write about what sets you apart from other applicants. Did you build a rocket? Start a charity?

4. Write with passion
Write with the same passion that you bring to your hobbies, talents, and skills. The reader will be able to tell if you are writing with passion or just writing to get the job done.

Good luck! Do you have any other helpful tips to add?

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May 15th 2013

Do you need help with confusing words?

regardless or irregardless

Is it “regardless” or “irregardless?”

The English language has many confusing words that sound. Here are 4 quick tips from Ginger’s blog to help clear up the confusion!

Regardless, NOT Irregardless!
Always AVOID using the word irregardless. Regardless means “without regard to” or “despite.” For example, “I will go for a jog today, regardless of how cold it is outside.”

Irregardless is not a word, and often misused both conversationally and in writing. The word probably arose from combining “regardless” and “irrespective.” Read more

Immigration or Emigration?
“Immigration” is the act of moving into a country. (The “i” stands for into.) Similarly, “emigration” concerns the act of moving away, or exiting, your county. (The “e” stands for exit.) Read more

Compliment VS Complement
Compliment can be a noun meaning a polite expression of praise or admiration. It can also be a verb meaning to congratulate or praise someone for something.

Complement is also both a noun and a verb. In its role as a noun, complement is something that brings completes or brings something to perfection, just like the word “addition”. As a verb, complement mean to add, enhance or improve something much like the word supplement. Read more

Anyway vs. Anyways
“Anyway” is an adverb meaning regardless. Simply put, “anyway” without an S is correct. Always use it without the S.

“Anyways” with the S is considered slang, and is a part of nonstandard, colloquial, or informal English. Read more

What confusing words would you like to see on our blog?

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May 13th 2013

What would you say to a prehistoric hunter?

What if you had the opportunity to communicate with someone from 15,000 years ago? What would you say? What could you say?

You, hear me!

Give this fire to that old man.

Pull the black worm off the bark and give it to the mother.

And no spitting in the ashes!

If you found yourself muttering these sentences in your native tongue while mingling with hunter-gatherers, you just might be understood. Many of today’s modern languages originate from an ancient common ancestrial language in Asia, and researchers now think that a surprising number of words have been preserved over time.

The words in these sentences come from a fascinating list of 23 ancient “cognates,” or words that both sound the same and mean the same thing, that date back to the end of the last Ice Age 15, 000 years ago. Examples of cognates of the word “father” include: padre (Italian), pere (French), pater (Latin) and pitar (Sanskrit).

Researchers at the University of Reading in England worked hard to identify these 23 words that have been “ultra-conserved” over 15,000 years. This new research contrasts the common view that words do not survive longer than 8,000-9,000 years.

Below is a complete list of the 23 words that have remained largely unchanged in several different languages.

thou, I, not, that, we, to give, who, this, what, man/male, ye, old, mother, to hear, hand, fire, to pull, black, to flow, bark, ashes, to spit, worm

Which words would you expect to see on the list?

Read more about this study here:  http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/linguists-identify-15000-year-old-ultraconserved-words/2013/05/06/a02e3a14-b427-11e2-9a98-4be1688d7d84_story.html

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May 8th 2013

How to Overcome Writer’s Block


Writer’s block is that horrible feeling where your imagination turns off and you are left with a loss for words. Writer’s block can be fleeting or last for years. In extreme cases, some authors have even quit their profession!

We have 3 solutions to keep your imagination active.

1. Solve a Problem
Writing about ways to solve a problem forces you to outline the problem and creatively think of solutions. Problems range from the simple to the complex. Is your microwave always dirty? Do your shoes always come untied while running upstairs? Are you looking for a better way to communicate with your boss? Brainstorm solutions and share them with the world.

2. Sleep!
A 15-minute nap can gently ease your stress and free up your imagination. Let’s face it, we all deserve a nap, don’t we?

Set a timer, lie down somewhere quiet and comfortable and let your thoughts run free until you drift into a light sleep. Short naps between 10-15 minutes are revitalizing. Don’t have an alarm nearby? You can use Salvadore Dali’s zany alternative. He would sit with his arm holding a spoon and relax and start to drift off to sleep. The spoon would loudly clatter to the ground when he completely fell asleep and wake him up. He claimed that this nap worked wonders – and we know he didn’t have a problem with creativity!

3. Take Pixar’s Advice: Write what would NOT happen next! http://thewritepractice.com/writers-block-pixar/

If you are stuck writing fiction, take a page out of Pixar’s giant library of success and write what would NOT happen next! Is your protagonist out on a walk by the beach? Make a list of bizarre things that would likely never happen.

Maybe a turtle walks out of the water and asks for directions (yes we are thinking about finding Nemo!). Perhaps a giant submarine pulls up and the president of the United States pops up and invites him to go surfing? While these ideas may not be relevant to your story, they will get your imagination working overtime, and at the very least give you a reason to smile and continue writing.

What ideas can you add?

 

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