Monthly Archives: May 2013

May 28th 2013

The Huffington Post highlights 3 ways that Ginger can improve your writing

A recent article in the Huffington Post highlights 3 of the ways that Ginger can improve your writing.

1. Ginger understands context!
To help perfect Ginger’s contextual spelling and grammar checker, Ginger has analyzed over 1 trillion sentences online. This giant base of knowledge makes Ginger’s suggestions for your writing always on target.

2. Ginger is personal!
Our newest feature, Ginger Coach, is now available with our premium product to help non-native English learners improve their language skills without the need for an expensive tutor or pricey textbooks.

3. Ginger is in your pocket!
We have taken our expertise and experience with the English language and have literally put it in your pocket. You can now download our Ginger keyboard for your Android device in the Google Play Store. Use Ginger’s Keyboard to make sure all of your writing is error-free even when you are on the run!

2 Comments

May 27th 2013

Ginger’s Word of the Week “Send and Run”

Are you guilty of using the “send and run” to deliver bad news? This genius phrase was UrbanDictionary.com’s word of the day on May 6.

Here is the “official” definition:

The act of delivering bad or unpleasant news via email at the very last point in the day, so as to purposely avoid being there when the response is received. Usually deployed just after 5pm or before going away on holiday.

Person 1 – “I really don’t want to have to deal with this”

Person 2 -“Why don’t you just do a send and run?”

If you are using the “send and run” option to deliver bad news ensure that you are not making the bad news even worse with bad grammar or spelling mistakes. To be sure your “send and runs” are error free use Ginger’s proofreader to check all your emails.

Have you ever used the “send and run?”

3 Comments

May 22nd 2013

4 Tips for Writing a College Admissions Essay

Are you about to start writing your college admissions essay? Don’t stress! We have 4 tips that will make the essay writing process simpler and smoother. Enjoy!

1.  Stay focused
Once you have started writing, stay on topic. Choose an experience in which you learned a life-changing lesson or have a story to tell and work hard to stay on this particular subject. Don’t be tempted to stray off topic or throw in other achievements along the way.

2. Describe the “why,” not the “what”
Start your application essay by explaining “why” you did something that you are proud of rather than just describing “what” you did or “how” you did it. Describing what prompted you to start your own business (the “why”) is more interesting than the details of how you did it (the “what”).

3. What makes YOU unique?
Describe the talents, hobbies and skills that YOU bring with you to college. Write about what sets you apart from other applicants. Did you build a rocket? Start a charity?

4. Write with passion
Write with the same passion that you bring to your hobbies, talents, and skills. The reader will be able to tell if you are writing with passion or just writing to get the job done.

Good luck! Do you have any other helpful tips to add?

Leave a comment

May 15th 2013

Do you need help with confusing words?

regardless or irregardless

Is it “regardless” or “irregardless?”

The English language has many confusing words that sound. Here are 4 quick tips from Ginger’s blog to help clear up the confusion!

Regardless, NOT Irregardless!
Always AVOID using the word irregardless. Regardless means “without regard to” or “despite.” For example, “I will go for a jog today, regardless of how cold it is outside.”

Irregardless is not a word, and often misused both conversationally and in writing. The word probably arose from combining “regardless” and “irrespective.” Read more

Immigration or Emigration?
“Immigration” is the act of moving into a country. (The “i” stands for into.) Similarly, “emigration” concerns the act of moving away, or exiting, your county. (The “e” stands for exit.) Read more

Compliment VS Complement
Compliment can be a noun meaning a polite expression of praise or admiration. It can also be a verb meaning to congratulate or praise someone for something.

Complement is also both a noun and a verb. In its role as a noun, complement is something that brings completes or brings something to perfection, just like the word “addition”. As a verb, complement mean to add, enhance or improve something much like the word supplement. Read more

Anyway vs. Anyways
“Anyway” is an adverb meaning regardless. Simply put, “anyway” without an S is correct. Always use it without the S.

“Anyways” with the S is considered slang, and is a part of nonstandard, colloquial, or informal English. Read more

What confusing words would you like to see on our blog?

1 Comment

May 13th 2013

What would you say to a prehistoric hunter?

What if you had the opportunity to communicate with someone from 15,000 years ago? What would you say? What could you say?

You, hear me!

Give this fire to that old man.

Pull the black worm off the bark and give it to the mother.

And no spitting in the ashes!

If you found yourself muttering these sentences in your native tongue while mingling with hunter-gatherers, you just might be understood. Many of today’s modern languages originate from an ancient common ancestrial language in Asia, and researchers now think that a surprising number of words have been preserved over time.

The words in these sentences come from a fascinating list of 23 ancient “cognates,” or words that both sound the same and mean the same thing, that date back to the end of the last Ice Age 15, 000 years ago. Examples of cognates of the word “father” include: padre (Italian), pere (French), pater (Latin) and pitar (Sanskrit).

Researchers at the University of Reading in England worked hard to identify these 23 words that have been “ultra-conserved” over 15,000 years. This new research contrasts the common view that words do not survive longer than 8,000-9,000 years.

Below is a complete list of the 23 words that have remained largely unchanged in several different languages.

thou, I, not, that, we, to give, who, this, what, man/male, ye, old, mother, to hear, hand, fire, to pull, black, to flow, bark, ashes, to spit, worm

Which words would you expect to see on the list?

Read more about this study here:  http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/linguists-identify-15000-year-old-ultraconserved-words/2013/05/06/a02e3a14-b427-11e2-9a98-4be1688d7d84_story.html

Leave a comment

May 8th 2013

How to Overcome Writer’s Block


Writer’s block is that horrible feeling where your imagination turns off and you are left with a loss for words. Writer’s block can be fleeting or last for years. In extreme cases, some authors have even quit their profession!

We have 3 solutions to keep your imagination active.

1. Solve a Problem
Writing about ways to solve a problem forces you to outline the problem and creatively think of solutions. Problems range from the simple to the complex. Is your microwave always dirty? Do your shoes always come untied while running upstairs? Are you looking for a better way to communicate with your boss? Brainstorm solutions and share them with the world.

2. Sleep!
A 15-minute nap can gently ease your stress and free up your imagination. Let’s face it, we all deserve a nap, don’t we?

Set a timer, lie down somewhere quiet and comfortable and let your thoughts run free until you drift into a light sleep. Short naps between 10-15 minutes are revitalizing. Don’t have an alarm nearby? You can use Salvadore Dali’s zany alternative. He would sit with his arm holding a spoon and relax and start to drift off to sleep. The spoon would loudly clatter to the ground when he completely fell asleep and wake him up. He claimed that this nap worked wonders – and we know he didn’t have a problem with creativity!

3. Take Pixar’s Advice: Write what would NOT happen next! http://thewritepractice.com/writers-block-pixar/

If you are stuck writing fiction, take a page out of Pixar’s giant library of success and write what would NOT happen next! Is your protagonist out on a walk by the beach? Make a list of bizarre things that would likely never happen.

Maybe a turtle walks out of the water and asks for directions (yes we are thinking about finding Nemo!). Perhaps a giant submarine pulls up and the president of the United States pops up and invites him to go surfing? While these ideas may not be relevant to your story, they will get your imagination working overtime, and at the very least give you a reason to smile and continue writing.

What ideas can you add?

 

Leave a comment

May 6th 2013

Alternate Realities: The Subjunctive Mood

Phuc Tran speaking at TED

In his Ted Talk, “Grammar, Identity, and the Dark Side of the Subjunctive,  Phuc Tran discusses the subjunctive and how this verbal mood can impact the way in which we see the world.  

 “What would have happened if…”

How many times have you asked yourself this question? Phuk Tran often spends time thinking about what would have happened if his family had not escaped Saigon in 1975. Before boarding a bus to flee, Tran began crying and shrieking uncontrollably. His family did not get on the bus, which minutes later exploded. What if he had not cried? What if his family had not made it out of Saigon?

These type of “what if” questions are known as the subjunctive. The subjunctive mood is used for expressing hypothetical statements such as “what if,” “I wish,” “I would,” “I could,” etc. As opposed to the indicative mood, which is used for stating facts, the subjunctive mood expresses potential and alternate outcomes.

Subjunctive: Time/space dream machine

According to Tran, the subjunctive is a “time/space dream machine that can conjure alternative realities.” Since Vietnamese lacks the subjunctive mood, Tran had the ability to imagine alternate possibilities to various actions whereas his parents did not. For his parents, reality was simply what happened. There was no sense of what could have happened.

Many of us get brought down by wishing we were someone or something else, and this Tran refers to as the “dark side of the subjunctive.” Tran believes his parents’ resiliency to deal with their difficult situation stems from the lack of the subjunctive in Vietnamese. Without a linguistic way to express the concept, his parents did not waste time worrying about alternative realities.

Vietnamese optimism

In a 2011 Gallup International poll, Vietnam was considered the most optimistic country, a fact that Tran attributes to their lack of a subjunctive mood. Without the ability to linguistically express what could have happened, Vietnamese do not spend time pondering over what they “should have” done, and instead, live with what happened or did not happen.

While the subjunctive can cause us unnecessary anxiety by worrying “what if,” it also allows us beautiful creativity in our thoughts and language. Use the power of the subjunctive correctly – choose to have an optimistic outlook like the Vietnamese, but continue to dream the lovely dreams of “what if.”

Check out Tran’s TED Talk here: http://tedxdirigo.com/speakers/phuc-tran/

Leave a comment