Monthly Archives: April 2013

Apr 30th 2013

5 Tips for Stress-Free Essay Writing

Do you dread writing essays? Does just the thought of doing the research make you break out in a cold sweat? Stop worrying and start writing! Use these 5 quick tips to help lessen your essay agony and increase your productivity.

1. Choose an engaging topic!
This may seem obvious, but picking an essay topic that you feel connected to will keep you writing when the going gets tough and your coffee runs out.

2. Write everyday!
December 15th may seem light years away when you are enjoying the sunny, carefree afternoons of late September, but it isn’t. Write early and write often to save yourself from last-minute stress!

3. Finish at the start!
Only write the introductory paragraph after you have finished the rest of your essay and you can explain your thesis and arguments in the best way possible. 

4. Set realistic time goals.
Telling yourself that you will sit down for 5 hours to work on your essay is easier said than done. Manage your time by taking a 5-minute break every 25 minutes. This helps you stay fresh and in control of your inevitable distractions.

5. Either lose the mistakes or lose your marks!
Download Ginger’s Spelling and Grammar Checker to keep your essay error-free!

 

What tips can you add?

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Apr 14th 2013

What’s Your Style?

English is the most complex and vocabulary-rich language in the world. As of January 2012, there over 1 million words in use and a new word is added to the English language every 98 minutes! English incorporates many words and grammatical rules from other languages which makes it even more complicated.

How do we use language? Naturally, with so many influences and new additions, there tend to be disagreements on how language is used. Below are three disagreements over style.

Is it email or e-mail?

Back in 2011, this question was in the news due to two giants in the writing business: the Associated Press and the New York Times. To hyphenate or not to hyphenate? The AP Stylebook removed the hyphen since they thought it was only needed to explain that email meant “electronic mail” in the early days of the internet where new concepts needed clarification.

The New York Times decided to stick with the hyphen in e-mail while acknowledging that there is no longer the need to write the “message” after the word e-mail as in “e-mail message.”

Starting a sentence with and or but

Grammatically speaking, it is acceptable to start a sentence with “and” or “but.” The problem with starting your sentence with one of these conjunctions is that your writing will often come off as informal.

Instead, you can replace “and” with “in addition” and replace “but” with “however” to sound more professional.  

Hanged or Hung?

Until recently, both “hanged” and “hung” were used as the past participle of hang.

Today, however, “hanged” usually only refers to someone who has been executed by hanging: “His neighbor was hanged.”

Objects are “hung”: “Nostalgic posters were hung around the restaurant.”

 

Do you have other examples of style differences in English?

 


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